Drift.

#8: DRIFT. 'Allow yourself to wander aimlessly. Explore adjacencies. Lack judgement. Postpone criticism.' - Bruce Mau's Incomplete Manifesto for Growth

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A peek at Eighteen Bridges magazine (eighteenbridges.com)

beatonna:

I wrote a short essay for this month’s issue of Eighteen Bridges.  Click on the screen-grab to read the whole thing.  Eighteen Bridges is a Canadian literary magazine and a good one at that, please take the time to poke around some more and have a read.

Someday I’ll make a comic about Cape Breton drawn with my tears or something, you know how it is.  

Book Research, by the Numbers

I recently travelled to Newfoundland to research resettlement communities—places the government moved between the 1950s and 1970s. I’d been studying people who chose to leave home for my book about modern nomads, mobility and alternative communities. Now I wanted to meet people who couldn’t bear to leave.

Boats in the harbour of the Fogo Island Co-op in Joe Batt’s Arm, Newfoundland.

I’m going through fifteen hours of interviews, thousands of words of notes, and a bunch of amateur pictures. More to come, but first a tallying up of numbers (alas, no Nicholas Felton treatment, I’m afraid):

One generous research grant.

12 days

1,800 kilometres driven

Two caribou and minke whales sighted (each)

70% rain, 20% wind, 10%fog

12 interviews with fishers

Four islands visited

Two boat trips

Now … writing.

A tilting fishing stage where fish are stored in the community of Tilting, on Fogo Island, Newfoundland.

This research was completed with assistance from Access Copyright Foundation, which supports publishers, writers and visual arts organisations through its grant programme.

This is What a Ghost Town Looks Like

themodernnomad:

imageimage


The photo on the left is of Joseph and Elizabeth Hodder on their cod flakes in Ireland’s Eye, Newfoundland, circa 1950. The photo on the right is Llewellyn Toopes’ abandoned twine shop and house in 1989, more than twenty years after most people on Ireland’s Eye were relocated under the Newfoundland government’s resettlement program.

Source: Maritime History Museum’s “Resettlement Photos” collection.

This is what a ghost town looks like.

The photo on the left is of Joseph and Elizabeth Hodder on their cod flakes in Ireland’s Eye, Newfoundland, circa 1950. The photo on the right is Llewellyn Toopes’ abandoned twine shop and house in 1989, more than twenty years after most people on Ireland’s Eye were relocated under the Newfoundland government’s resettlement program.

The Modern Nomad: A Word for Newfoundland 

themodernnomad:

In early June I’ll head to Newfoundland to research communities that were resettled between the 1950s and 1960s. Curious about outsider perspectives on “The Rock,” a nickname that gives you a sense of the landscape, I’ve been wading through articles from the mid to late 19th century. The…

You know there’s this kind of belief that you can’t go home. I was quite surprised to find out that you darn well can go home, for two reasons: my work is here, and I really love being here. I find that it’s just a nourishing place to be. And given the choice, this is where I’d rather be. And now I have a choice.––Zita Cobb, Fogo Island

In Praise of Distraction: “Techno-cognitive Nomads” and the Perks of ADHD

“It’s been hypothesized that ADHD might even be an advantage in certain change-rich environments. Researchers have discovered, for instance, that a brain receptor associated with ADHD is unusually common among certain nomads in Kenya, and that members who have the receptor are the best nourished in the group. It’s possible that we’re all evolving toward a new techno-cognitive nomadism, a rapidly shifting environment in which restlessness will be an advantage again. The deep focusers might even be hampered by having too much attention: Attention Surfeit Hypoactivity.” – Sam Anderson praises distraction in this 2009 piece for New York magazine.

In Praise of Distraction: “Techno-cognitive Nomads” and the Perks of ADHD

“It’s been hypothesized that ADHD might even be an advantage in certain change-rich environments. Researchers have discovered, for instance, that a brain receptor associated with ADHD is unusually common among certain nomads in Kenya, and that members who have the receptor are the best nourished in the group. It’s possible that we’re all evolving toward a new techno-cognitive nomadism, a rapidly shifting environment in which restlessness will be an advantage again. The deep focusers might even be hampered by having too much attention: Attention Surfeit Hypoactivity.” – Sam Anderson praises distraction in this 2009 piece for New York magazine.

Modern Nomad book excerpt on Occupy London

themodernnomad:

Boulderpavement, a literary magazine published by The Banff Centre, in Canada, has just published an excerpt from the modern nomad book that looks at Occupy London and the life of a temporary community.

Read it here: http://bit.ly/PEcYQY

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